Current Research Openings

Post-doc position to study microglia and spinal cord injury in Department of Neuroscience at The Ohio State University

 

Job Description: The Popovich lab has a postdoc opening to study neuroinflammatory mechanisms of injury and repair in models of traumatic or ischemic spinal cord injury (SCI). This project builds on recently published data from our lab showing that priming spinal cord microglia with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a naturally-occurring component of bacteria, confers marked neuroprotection and protects from paralysis. We seek to define mechanisms by which microglia communicate with other cells in the spinal cord to confer resistance to injury and coordinate repair of cells that are injured or stressed as a result of mechanical or ischemic damage. Related projects seek to translate techniques for microglial priming into the clinic as novel interventional strategies to prevent paralysis and loss of function after traumatic or ischemic spinal cord injury.

 

Preferred Expertise and Qualifications: Successful candidates will have a Ph.D/M.D. or equivalent with at least one relevant publication (or one in review). Candidates will ideally have content and technical expertise relevant to one or more of the following areas: immunology, neuroscience, spinal cord injury, mouse genetics, imaging, sequencing (RNAseq/scRNAseq) and/or informatics. Experience with small animal survival surgical techniques is desirable.

Project start date is flexible, but can begin immediately. The initial appointment is for 1 year, with the possibility to extend it annually based on satisfactory progress. The postdoc will have the opportunity to mentor one or more graduate students working on associated efforts and to publish their work in top tier scientific journals and present their data at national and international conferences.

 

Relevant lab publications include:

1. Microglia-organized scar-free spinal cord repair in neonatal mice. Nature. 2020 Nov;587(7835):613-618. doi: 10.1038/s41586-020-2795-6. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

PMID: 33029008 

 

2. Human immune cells infiltrate the spinal cord and impair recovery after spinal cord injury in humanized mice. Sci Rep. 2019 Dec 13;9(1):19105. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-55729-z.

PMID: 31836828 

 

3. Cell-Type-Specific Interleukin 1 Receptor 1 Signaling in the Brain Regulates Distinct Neuroimmune Activities. Immunity. 2019 Mar 19;50(3):764-766. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2019.02.012. PMID: 30893590 

 

4. Serial Systemic Injections of Endotoxin (LPS) Elicit Neuroprotective Spinal Cord Microglia through IL-1-Dependent Cross Talk with Endothelial Cells. J Neurosci. 2020 Nov 18;40(47):9103-9120. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0131-20.2020. Epub 2020 Oct 13. PMID: 33051350 

For more information or to apply, contact Dr. Popovich at: phillip.popovich@osumc.edu

Post-doc position to study neuroimmunology and spinal cord injury in Department of Neuroscience at The Ohio State University

 

Job Description: The Popovich lab has a postdoc opening to study mechanisms underlying spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced immune dysfunction. This project builds on published data from our lab showing that SCI impairs survival and function of mature immune cells and the hematopoietic precursor cells from which the immune system is derived. We seek to define mechanisms by which SCI disrupts normal neuro-immune communication leading to immune dysfunction and the ability to protect against infection or repair of the injured CNS and peripheral tissues.  The qualified candidate will work together with an accomplished group of senior and junior scientists within the Popovich lab and the Belford Center for Spinal Cord Injury where related research topics are in progress.  

 

Preferred Expertise and Qualifications: Successful candidates will have a Ph.D/M.D. or equivalent with at least one relevant publication (or one in review). Candidates will ideally have content and technical expertise relevant to one or more of the following areas: immunology, neuroscience, spinal cord injury, mouse genetics, imaging, sequencing (RNAseq/scRNAseq) and/or informatics. Experience with small animal survival surgical techniques is desirable.

 

Project start date is flexible, but can begin immediately. The initial appointment is for 1 year, with the possibility to extend it annually based on satisfactory progress. The postdoc will have the opportunity to mentor one or more graduate students working on associated efforts and to publish their work in top tier scientific journals and present their data at national and international conferences.

 

Relevant lab publications include:

1. Acute post-injury blockade of α2δ-1 calcium channel subunits prevents pathological autonomic plasticity after spinal cord injury. Cell Reports. 2021 Jan 26;34(4):108667. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2020.108667. PMID: 33503436

 

2. Spinal cord injury causes chronic bone marrow failureNat Commun. 2020 Jul 24;11(1):3702. doi: 10.1038/s41467-020-17564-z. PMID: 32710081 

 

3. Gut dysbiosis impairs recovery after spinal cord injury. J Exp Med. 2016 Nov 14;213(12):2603-2620. doi: 10.1084/jem.20151345. Epub 2016 Oct 17. PMID: 27810921 Free PMC article.

 

4. Spinal Cord Injury Suppresses Cutaneous Inflammation: Implications for Peripheral Wound Healing. J Neurotrauma. 2017 Mar 15;34(6):1149-1155. doi: 10.1089/neu.2016.4611. Epub 2016 Oct 17. PMID: 27650169 

 

5. Silencing spinal interneurons inhibits immune suppressive autonomic reflexes caused by spinal cord injury. Nat Neurosci. 2016 Jun;19(6):784-7. doi: 10.1038/nn.4289. Epub 2016 Apr 18. PMID: 27089020 Free PMC article.

For more information or to apply, contact Dr. Popovich at: phillip.popovich@osumc.edu